Wednesday, August 19, 2009

I'm a Legacy....so I have nothing to worry about!!!!




What is a Legacy? A Legacy is a person whose mother, grandmother, is a member of the sorority she wants to join, or who's father, grandfather is a member of the fraternity he wants to become a member of.

What's the deal behind being a legacy? Is it helpful? Hurtful? Does it guarantee you a spot in the organization of your choice?   Sometime it's helpful, and other times it does not matter. I would highly suggest that you do your research. There are some organizations out there that have a legacy, where there is a place that you can put that on your application. Alpha Kappa Alpha, has an application for legacies that can be found here:

http://www.aka1908.com/pdf/undergrad_legacy_app_5_07.pdf

For this organization, however, your mother/grandmother/stepmother being a member of AKA is not enough, according to their website, they must have a living family member must have been active for at least two (2) years immediately preceding the membership. Other organizations have guidelines behind legacy status as well. I have a few friends who according to them, became AKAs due to their legacy status. They were proud of that it, and I was happy for them. Becoming a member of these organizations is hard enough, so if the organization of your choice has a legacy clause giving you extra "bonus points" in becoming a member, I say go for it! More power to a ya! As far as Delta is a concern we do NOT have a legacy clause for membership. If your mother/grandmother is an active and financial member of DST, then you will have to apply and go through the same steps that other prospective members have to go through who do not have a family member in that particular organization. For some of my sorors, this is a bitter pill to swallow since there have been cases where their daughters did NOT make line. Some find being a legacy a problem because at several colleges and universities, they have a cap of how many people can be accepted into membership. If the organization have a legacy clause, then it becomes harder for prospects who are not legacy. For example, XYZ university has a cap of 50 members. 40 prospective members are legacy members. That would mean that there are only 10 spots left.

Some prospective members feel since their father/mother/grandfather/grandmother etc. is a member, and then they are a "shoe in" for that organization. That is NOT the case. None of my family members were Deltas when I went through MIP and even if they were, if I had the option, I would choose NOT to use their membership status to gain membership into the organization. I would have preferred to become a member through my merit! If you decide rely on your legacy status then I say go for it. No one will shame you for it, and it's really no one's business other than you, and the organization that you are trying to become a member of. 

In conclusion, unless that particular organization has a certain set of rules about legacy, I would NOT rely on the fact that your family member is a member to guarantee you a spot! Instead, I would use them to ask question surrounding the organization about the rush, interview, and any advice they can give you about becoming a member. My personal feelings about legacy? There is nothing wrong with being a legacy. If I had a daughter, I would hope she would follow my footsteps and become a member of my organization. I would hope to prepare her enough that she will be able to one day, share the other half of her mid, with my mid.

40 comments:

  1. I know they don't have a "public" legacy clause, but I was told that in the constitution and bylaws it says that any daughter, sister (and granddaughter as well) must be initiated in the organization, and then refers to the membership requirements.
    It doesn't say this on the site such as AKA does, but it does in the bylaws.

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  2. If that is true it means a legacy cannot be denied entrance just because she is a legacy. She must meet the requirements and get the vote of the chapter. I know many legacies that did not get selected on their first try.

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  3. Ya'll, please.

    I would like to hear this advice from someone who IS actually a legacy or would be. Hearing this from someone who is not makes the non-legacy sound totally bias and a little bit on the jealous side.

    Please do not make pledging legacy sound like such a bad thing. You probably assumed that you didn't make it seem that way, but by saying "using their membership status to gain membership into an organization" you are making it sound as if a person is negatively taking advantage of a blessing that was given to them. There is absolutely nothing wrong with pledging legacy. If you have the opportunity, and your grades and community service look great, then TAKE THE CHANCE of pledging legacy. It is that way for a reason. Anyone who doesn't like it is more than likely a non-legacy. This is coming from a non-legacy person like myself.

    Yes, a prospective AKA, legacy or not, MUST also meet the requirements (such as GPA and community service) to get in, but if you read the AKA prospective members legacy (undergraduate) section more clearly, you will see that those individuals are NOT subject to getting a chapter vote. If this were the case, I can imagine how many legacies didn't get in because of a bunch of haters.

    Usually people try to influence you to pledge non-legacy (when you really are a legacy) because they feel that it is unfair or they try to make it seem as if they are a more accomplished member than a legacy is. Bull. Whatever the case, an AKA is an AKA, legacy or not. Just get over it.

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    1. This is the Delta Sigma Theta Legacy By Law

      I. A legacy is a daughter, sister, mother or granddaughter of a soror, who must be initiated into the sorority provided she meets all requirements for membership (as outlined in Article II - Membership, Section 1, Requirements for Collegiate Membership Intake or Section 2. Requirements for Alumnae Membership Intake).

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    2. From Delta Sigma Theta By Laws

      I. A legacy is a daughter, sister, mother or granddaughter of a soror, who must be initiated into the sorority provided she meets all requirements for membership (as outlined in Article II - Membership, Section 1, Requirements for Collegiate Membership Intake or Section 2. Requirements for Alumnae Membership Intake).

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  4. I'm a legacy, and I agree with the poster! Times has changed, and I am sick and tired of legacy thinking they have it in the bag and can become members automatically. They aren't humble, have attitudes, and think the world owes them something! If I had my say I would get RID of the entire legacy clause in Alpha Kappa Alpha. If I could count the number of times I have seen freshmen walk on campus, and tell everybody and their mama "yes I am pledging AKA, or I have secured my spot and there's nothing that they can do about it, or I don't have to work as hard, or kiss @ss because my mama/grandma, ect already secured it for me, I am going to scream!

    To the above poster, I have personally witnessed many of them "using their membership status to gain membership" and it drives me crazy! I am a legacy, but never told them! I wanted to get in on my OWN merit, and I did! Hell, my own MAMA didn't even know I was interested in pledging AKA, and she was proud when she saw me do it on my own.

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    1. I am so glad that I found this. My daughter submitted her application and was denied, however my co worker is an AKA and her daughter also submitted her application. Long story short my daughter was denied and hers was not. Hours before she found out my co worker called me upset because her daughter changed her mind and did not want to do it. So of course my child is devastated. She attended forums and more....... However co- workers daughter did absolutely NOTHING!!!!, but she made it.
      Again it is promising to know your thoughts about this Legacy issue.

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  5. Glad I found this site.

    Above poster, I can understand where you're coming from, but bottom line is-- not all legacies are that way. Period. There are several non-legacies who are complete butt-holes...but they're OK, right, because they got in on "their own merit"? From what I have seen, even the legacy prospectives still get hazed and get treated even worse because so many people hate on them for being legacies. So all in all, legacies are more than likely going through the same process as non-legacies as far as having to attend events and community services and being hazed and all that and the ONLY difference is that they don't get VOTED on...and everyone's mad at that? Whether you know it or not, there ARE legacy prospectives who are humble and do everything asked of them, but small minded people will never get to see them for who they really are just because they're too busy focusing on the fact that they didn't get voted on like everyone else did. That's retarded.

    And anyways, people are totally missing the point of what a legacy is. It's not a "free ride", no matter what you think, it's about continuing the legacy, honor and committment of a foremother who once made that right choice. but we shouldn't down-cast ANYONE deciding to continue the precious legacy of her mother, grandmother etc.The legacy clause is more than likely here to stay. Get over it, embrace it, and Encourage them!If you just absolutely hate that part of your sorority you supposedly love so much, then you probably should have pledge a sorority that doesn't have the legacy clause. The legacy idea was meant to be a beautiful thing many years ago and just about everyone's making it out to be dirt. I personally would be pissed if someone SMALL minded completely did away with the legacy clause based on what people say and think about it.Congrats that you had an AKA mother and decided to go non-legacy, but you're no different from the girl who decided to pledge legacy because a soror is a soror. Treat her the same as a non-legacy regardless of your opinions. I'm happy that you made it even without the legacy clause but that was YOUR choice and you shouldn't judge legacy members based on what you've seen in your one little section.

    And by the way, legacies do pledge on their OWN merit, because they could have easily pledged any other sorority if they wanted, which many daughters of AKA's have, believe it or not. so you pledge, non-legacy, your choice. Congrats.

    God bless.

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    1. Frat GUY here: the legacy rule is there for a reason. I can't tell you how many daughters of women I was in undergraduate with were not taken into their sorority. These young ladies were perfectly fine, and were turned down for petty and non-important reasons. We respected the legacies of our prospective pledgees and only turned them away for significant reasons. I was not a legacy but respected those who wanted to follow in a father's or grandfather's footsteps, as long as they wanted it for themselves. We all know the selection process can get VERY petty.

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    2. Julia Nickelberry WilkinsJanuary 8, 2017 at 8:36 PM

      Legacy to me is very significant in that our off Springs find favor in DST rather than another. This speaks highly of the organization. Let'stand not be petty.

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  6. Hey poster, if you're such a proud member of DST then why are you taking your precious time picking apart, being critical and analyzing the ways of another sorority? Is that even really your business? Why do you even care?

    So your sorority doesn't have a legacy clause. Big whoop.

    Just asking.

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    1. She probably kind of wishes DST did have a legacy clause."Even if they did have one, I wouldn't do legacy" Bull.

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    2. If you are going to quote her, then QUOTE HER! She never said that,she said quote" "if I had the option I would chose NOT use their membership status to gain membership into the organization" she never said anything about NOT doing legacy, BIG DIFFERENCE! Also she is only stating what is on the National Website which is open to the public. I understood her message, she didn't bash legacy she is just telling people not to rely on it, and I agree with her. They shouldn't!

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    3. No it is the same thing. Self explanatory so I don't have to explain myself. And sweetheart,You should calm down. It's not as nearly as serious as you're screaming uneccessarily with your ALL CAPS.

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    4. ^^I feel an uneccessary bickering match between these two lol. Both of ya'll need serious LIVES. Not even gonna state my opinion on this subject because people seem to forget that "opinions" are calling opinions for a reason....everyone won't agree and there's no right or wrong/black or white answer to everything. So your take on legacy is your take on legacy but let's just leave it at that.

      Good day folks.

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  7. I agree with the very very last poster like what was the point of posting something like this? just cause you can, right? you have "the right" to---first amendment freedom of speech. Typical American response these days.

    oh and btw if you haven't gotten them already good luck on your degrees! You go girl!

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  8. ^^ummmm...maybe because this is HER blog, and she can do what she wants with it?

    God bless.

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  9. As a legacy and someone trying to be a member of such an esteemed organization I feel no way. Yes, I am a legacy to deny that is like denying your parent and if the organization does it research can they not find out who you are and where you come from. I truly do understand what others mean by getting it on your own but the person you are legacy of isn't there holding your hand they just gave birth and raised you and hopefully by their orginization's standards. With that stated i won't hide my status of being a legacy because to disqualify or discredit me of that only shows where someone else stands.

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  10. I'm a legacy looking to join an organization, and I gotta say this makes me reluctant to even mention it.

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  11. I'm like the above comment. I, too, am a legacy and I plan on not mentioning it at all. Especially since my mother is currently inactive, making it somewhat irrelevant in regards to the clause. If anyone believes that foolishness about every legacy getting in, I advise you to check out the news story of the AKA who is suing Howard and her sorority because her daughter was not admitted, even through the legacy clause. It IS NOT a guarantee, it simply is a fast pass for your paperwork process. You will be one of the first considered, not admitted.

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    1. Just a disclaimer. The reason those girls didn't make it is because they didn't meet all of the requirements

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  12. So sad to see blacks put their own down. Inheriting things and continuing your family's legacy is considered a blessing in white households. It's a sense of pride and accomplishment, not to mention its how they maintain generational wealth. I'm saddened that black people dismiss a good thing. We will never get ahead if we don't learn the importance of passing things down.

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  13. My daughter joined AKA as a legacy. It wasn't easy and it wasn't a guarantee. She is very sweet and humble young lady who was fully prepared to receive a letter saying that she was not selected. I think it is unfair to label an entire group of women as being one particular kind of way.

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  14. That's great for you daughter, my niece didn't make it and was told they had too many legacies on the line that they HAD To accept. She was very sad about it and couldn't understand why they wouldn't just go off of merit, scholarship, her service to the community ect....She was told personally by the chapter president that she would have made line if there wasn't so many legacies. Her mom is a Zeta and told her that's what she gets for trying to pledge something else.

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  15. Hello, I am a legacy and I plan on submitting as one. At first, I was skeptical of submitting as one because I do not want anything handed to me, I want to earn everything just as my mother did. As time went on, I sat and thought about it....it should be an honor to tell people that you are legacy, of course I really had no choice to hide it since my mother walks around proudly with her paraphernalia. I would love to actually embrace the fact that I am one. Yes, I know it is not an open slot for me just because my mother is one, but I hate when people judge others of someone else's character. Not every legacy is rude or mean, most of us have some type of sense.

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  16. I'm a legacy and became a member of DST 15 years ago. I was granted membership on my merits not on my legacy status. I did not flaunt that my mom was a soror. It was truly only revealed during my initiation that my mom was a soror because she attended. I wouldn't focus so much on the legacy issue and focus on being granted acceptance based on personal merits.

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  17. I am a legacy for DST by 3 generations ( great grandmother, grandmother and mother). I have be denied membership into DST twice, once with a 3.8 and a charter members letter (did not receive majority vote), and the second time I was denied due to majority vote again. So no, just because you're a "legacy" does not guarantee you a spot. I tried both times to get in on my merit and still did not make it. And now I'm working on a third time.

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  18. Being a legacy doesn't mean a free ride! A legacy has to & should meet all the same requirements/criteria as a non-legacy candidate. Therefore, their acceptance is on their own merits!!! The legacy clause just ensures that after meeting these requirements, a legacy is not given a raw deal because of her legacy status-which is starting to be the case on many undergrad chapters/campuses. My daughter was denied acceptance with a 3.0 GPA, several years of public service since high school, joined two other organizations while in college to get more public service, recommendation letters were on point, interview went well, (not a whore or dating someones boyfriend), she came out to a soror her interest in Delta, went to & participated in chapter activities, and never mentioned her legacy in her application. Never mentioned me. Her Mother! A soror for 31 years (Lambda '83). Very active & financial Diamond Life member since 2000 and who has taught her daughter the meaning of sisterhood & service. I also volunteer for a girls mentoring & service club outside of Delta (to which my daughter has too belonged). No free ride, just a fair ride! Other than not getting the chapter vote, which I don't understand, we have no answer. My problem is she did deny her legacy. Why, because some sorors don't want legacies so they can Haze. Why, because some sorors are clueless to the importance to carrying on a legacy. Why, because of haters within our organization. I agree with the person who stated that white people embrace their legacy. It is a sense of pride and it is sad that as black people we don't recognize that. The attitude of " I got mine, so you get yours" is an attitude that will continue to keep Blacks down for years to come. My daughter is a legacy, a legacy which will never be denied again!

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  19. As a legacy, I find it perplexing as to why so many greeks (who are largely not legacies) are so eager to reject the daughters/sons/grandkids etc. of their sorors/brothers just because. I'm sorry, but it's spiteful and ignorant.

    This stereotype of legacies being cocky and feeling entitled is ridiculous. Most of us, being raised by members of BGLOs, understand the concept of hard work and that nothing in life worth having comes easy.

    A lot of these chapters reject legacies because they don't want anyone knowing more about the org than they are willing to tell them and because, like the above person said, they want to do things their way instead of how their org has directed them and count on their pledges being ignorant of the truth.

    A legacy is a beautiful thing, but some people are turning into a badge of shame. The fact that legacies feel they have to hide it or lie about it is sad. I'm not saying scream it from the roof tops, but if someone asks, they shouldn't be afraid to tell them.
    Some of these greeks are going to be upset when, one day, they want their child to cross into their org and they get rejected just because.

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  20. If you are a legacy because your mother is in a particular BGLO, is it appropriate to ask her to write your letter of recommendation? Or does it have to be from someone who is not related to you? I would REALLY appreciate an answer to this question!

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    1. Yes, my mommy is writing me a letter when i graduate high school and hit my first or second year in college. like somebody said earlier in the comments, it is a great advantage to have a member of the sorority. It is only best to have them as a guidance (almost like a cheat sheet HA!). However way you feel is comfortable. :)

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  21. Has anyone conducted any research on when the legacy clause began? My soror believes that the legacy clause began only a decade ago. I don't think that is the case. Who would have this information?

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  22. SO I didn't have my father in my life and was raised by a guy who is the best "father" that I could ever had. Will I be able to pledge his frat as a Legacy, if I wanted?

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  23. I think legacies should have a separate way into organizations because we are special. I don't understand how people that have high gpas, beating up people, are in these organizations. The whole process needs to be changed anyway cause a lot of nasty people have got in to DST.

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  24. I don't consider legacy candidates applying for membership into Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. in the same light as a candidate for Alpha Kappa Alpha, Inc.

    For the AKA candidate, they simply need the gpa, community service and an active relative to get in. No vote is required. For Delta, there is no free pass. A vote is still required.

    I love all my sisters. Having legacy candidates were hard because you knew that they didn't have to work to meet members of the sorority in order to gather sponsors. They already knew that they were guaranteed membership. Someone years ago did all the hard work for them. I had to work for years to get what was handed to them. That is difficult to swallow, but yes, that is part of the organization I joined. Do I like it? No. Do I blame the legacies? No. If I had the connections to have been a legacy would I have used them...Absolutely. I would have made certain to be humble about it and not brag from day 1 of orientation that AKA was in my future.

    The only other time it was difficult was when the legacies assumed that they knew everything or were slack about learning.

    All in all, I loved having legacies. While they can be a mixed bag, they were the best resources for information and their families were generally open and warm.

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  25. Hi,

    I was wondering if you could provide advice. I am looking to join an organization other than my mother's and she is unhappy. I am confident in my decision but how do I convince her that it is not to snub or betray her and that I'm only doing what I think is right for me? Thank you.

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  26. I do not feel that individuals that are legacies have a free ride. I have yet to see in any of the post where it was stated that a legacy does not have to do all of the activities that a non-legacy individual has to do. So if they are out there with the other individuals doing community services, attending meetings, etc., where is the special privilege? I can admit that it feels like they are getting special privileges since they don't have to get the vote, but just know that before they even get to that step that have to meet the other requirements if they are not met, having legacy status doesn't matter. I have met a number of individuals that chose not to claim their legacy status because the too want to feel as though they are making it on their own and I commend these individuals. However, as mentioned in previous post why should they have to deny their rightful status, why shouldn't being a legacy have some rewards? I am not saying that it should be a cake walk, but if they choose to follow in their relatives footsteps why should tis be a burden for them instead of it being a joyful moment in time? Until we as a race start to uplift each other and stop finding reasons to bring each other down we will never rise to our fullest potential. Every organization should have a legacy clause and everyone should respect it for the good that comes with it. stop making it a bad thing to be a legacy, stop coming up with reasons as to why a legacy should be denied membership, and take pride in having them and show them the love and respect that they deserve. Please remember that being a legacy should not be a death sentence. I ask that all of the black greek organizations that do not have a legacy clause to reconsider, because you need to look at yourself and note that you must be doing a great job if family members want to keep joining your organization year after year.

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  27. I actually hope that when my daughter has the opportunity that she will choose AKA. I'm a non legacy and I have done this hard work for her so that she won't have to go through what I did. I want her to be proud to be a legacy not shamed for it.

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